Daily Dozen – Four Years Ago Today

I started photographing people on and off in early 2008. It didn’t start in earnest until July 20. It was four years ago today that I really get the 1000faces project rolling. I was at PodCamp in Boston and feeling kind of bored. The idea popped into my head to try to photograph everyone at the event and I went to work. I didn’t get everyone over the course of those two days but I got a lot of people. When I saw all the faces together I was struck by how cool everyone looked together. That really cemented the idea to amass photos of faces. When I look at these early photos they’re not very good. Over time I’ve gotten better at it and have refined the way I approach people and process the images. I’ve also changed gear over the years as well. Still though, it’s nice to see where things started. Enjoy.

Faces 58
Faces 63
Faces 77
Faces 87
Faces 101
faces 107
Faces 117
Faces 131
Faces 129
Faces 150
Faces 151
Faces 149

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Daily Dozen – Ladies Looking Away

I liked Friday’s “no eye contact” theme and decided to do it again for women this time. To find the images I went back to my first set of 1000faces. I love looking through the early sets and recalling the people I’ve met and the occasions that I’ve photographed. Give them a look. I hope you’ll enjoy them.

Faces 190
Faces 26
Faces 361
Faces 224
Faces 453
Faces 491
Faces 613
faces 643
Faces 728
Faces 788
faces 915
faces 636

Fresh Faces 17

We’re six weeks into 2010. I’m still out of work and I am *just* getting around to posting some of the great faces I’ve seen so far this year. I started this in March of 2007 so I’d getting close to the two year mark – hard to believe. I’m also getting close to 2,000 photographs. I really want to find a way to exhibit some number of them. Individually I think many of these faces are fantastic – but when you can see them together, especially if you can see them large – it is amazing. If anyone has any ideas, connections or a desire to help don’t keep it to yourself!

On to the faces!

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

Faces

As always, if you’re having an event and want the faces of the people who were there let me know and I’ll see if I can make it.

Color on the Web

I’ve noticed a few times that some of the pictures I take and work hard on look totally different – and often like crap – once they are in the browser. Some people go on about choosing the right color space for the Web while others talk about complex exporting and saving processes.

Here’s the bottom line – I want my images (which go from raw to dng and finally out for the Web as jpg using sRGB) to look more or less the same in most cases. And it’s really disappointing when they don’t. The blame rests solely on the browser developers. sRGB is a standard color space – so why do some browsers make such a mess? Here are four versions of the same image captured from four different browsers:

Firefox

Firefox

Safari

Safari

Chrome

Chrome

Opera

Opera

Of course how they look to me is going to be different to how they look to you – since you’ll be looking at them with your own browser which will impart its own interpretation of color onto them. Safari apparently does color management – and Firefox does with a plug-in but how many casual Web surfers are going to bother? Is it that hard to simply build this into the browser to begin with? Is the thinking that some people don’t want accurate color? Hmmm.

To me it’s like a browser that decided to remove any adverbs or adjectives from writing. Or maybe one that had a built in thesaurus and would substitute random words. It just wouldn’t be acceptable. So why is it acceptable to do the same with visual images?

A couple of requests. First, which browser (based on the above – and realizing you can’t see the original image) does the best job? Second, gripe a lot about this whenever you can. It’s really annoying.